THE DAY THE PLANET EARTH STOOD EVEN (1951) & ARRIVAL (2016)

THE DAY THE PLANET EARTH STOOD EVEN (1951) & ARRIVAL (2016)

The first movies noted on IMDb and Letterboxd isn’t really a film whatsoever. In 1874, French astronomer Pierre Janssen got part of an international work to observe and learning the passage of Venus against the sunrays. This incident merely takes place every 120 years, therefore naturally Janssen desired to record this once-in-a-lifetime show photographically if he could. To take action, the guy invented the a€?photographic revolver,a€? an instrument able to getting 48 photographs in 72 moments that a€“ when found in fast succession a€“ created a moving picture. The outcome: Passage of Venus (1874).

Though Janssen truthfully guessed that their creation will help further the study of animal movement, the guy couldn’t has predicted the cinematic art that would spring out from advancements like his, nor could the guy have actually thought that their obsession with room as well as its a lot of unknowns will be shared by hundreds of filmmakers during that art form’s existence (including early quiet film leader Georges Melies, whose day at the Moon we presented several weeks ago). Continue reading “THE DAY THE PLANET EARTH STOOD EVEN (1951) & ARRIVAL (2016)”